Image by Pauline Loroy

Loose Leash Walking

Walking a dog on a loose leash is one of the hardest skills for people to learn. Yes, people! Dogs can't learn a skill if they are getting confusing instructions. It takes two to pull on a leash!

LEASH HANDLING

With good leash skills, even an untrained dog can be kept under control. 

  1. Choose a good quality leash that is comfortable in your hand. Soft leather, cotton, and rope style leashes are most comfortable. Nylon can give you blisters, and chain leashes can break fingers. Flexi (retractable) leashes teach dogs to pull because they only work if the dog pulls on it

  2. Choose a good quality training collar or harness such as a head halter or front-clip harness. Harnesses that clip behind the dog's shoulders are great for hiking or cart-pulling but not for training because they make it easier for the dog to pull.

  3. Hold the leash securely using the "leash lock" method.

  4. Let your arms hang naturally by your sides. Once your leash arm goes out in front of you, the dog is in control and pulling. Your center of gravity is off, and they can easily pull you off your feet. Walking a dog on a leash should feel exactly like walking without a dog - at your natural gait and arms swinging naturally.

  5. If your dog is large and strong and not yet leash trained, holding the leash with both hands against your hip will give you more control when you must walk your dog somewhere and can't work on training, such as visiting the vet.

  6. Resist the urge to "steer" your dog with the leash. The leash is there for safety and to comply with leash laws. Think of it as a brake and not a steering wheel. 

Leash Lock

DON'T ALLOW PULLING

By the time they get into obedience class, most dogs already have a habit of pulling. Habits get stronger the more we do them. They will never stop pulling on leash if they are practicing pulling on the leash every day. 

  1. Stop walks for now if they are not necessary. The extra training you are doing will make up for not getting the walks for a while. Play extra rounds of fetch or tug.

  2. If you must walk your dog because you don't have a fenced yard or need to take them to the vet, use good leash handling skills. If the leash gets tight, turn and walk in the opposite direction until your dog is next to you. Praise and treat for being next to you. Then turn back the way you were going.

  3. Make a commitment to not take a single step forward if the leash is tight. Every step your dog is allowed to take on a tight leash rewards them for pulling on leash and makes it harder to break the habit. It's "one more cigarette" for a person who is trying to quit.

  4. Practice the mechanics of loose leash walking inside your home first before going outside. We learn how to operate a car in a parking lot first before driving it in traffic. Teach your dog how to walk on a leash before asking them to use the skill in "traffic".

LEVEL 1

  1. Start inside your home with your dog on a leash.

  2. Hold the leash with the "leash lock" and arms in a natural position. The goal is to not "use" the leash at all. It's only there for safety and compliance with leash laws.

  3. Stand facing your dog, toe-to-toe.

  4. Take a couple of steps backwards so that your dog walks toward you, then turn to face the same direction as your dog and take another step.

  5. Feed your dog a treat for standing next to you. Give them the treat next to your leg and not out in front of you. Feed them in the position you want them to be in, which is beside you.

  6. Continue taking 1-3 steps and feeding your dog in position beside you until you run out of space.

  7. Repeat steps 3-6.

Success Criteria

Your dog is walking next to you consistently and not crossing in front of you, behind you, or between your legs. They understand the treat is for being beside you and not in front of you or behind you.

LEVEL 2

  1. Repeat Level 1 in different rooms inside your home.

Success Criteria

Your dog is walking next to you consistently and not crossing in front of you, behind you, or between your legs. They understand the treat is for being beside you and not in front of you or behind you.

LEVEL 3

  1. Repeat Level 1 in the back yard or other least exciting place outside of your home.

Success Criteria

Your dog is walking next to you consistently and not crossing in front of you, behind you, or between your legs. They understand the treat is for being beside you and not in front of you or behind you.

LEVEL 4

  1. Set up 3 cones or objects approximately 5' apart outside.

  2. Hold the leash with the "leash lock" and arms in a natural position. The goal is to not "use" the leash at all. It's only there for safety and compliance with leash laws.

  3. Ask your dog to "Sit" next to you at the first cone.

  4. Cue your dog to "Let's Go" and start walking. 

  5. Walk in a circle around all 3 cones until you are back where you started.

  6. Stop and ask your dog to "Sit" next to you. Give a treat.

  7. Cue your dog to "Let's Go" and start walking.

  8. Walk in a circle around only the first 2 cones until you are back where you started.

  9. Stop and ask your dog to "Sit" next to you. Give a treat.

  10. Cue your dog to "Let's Go" and start walking.

  11. Walk in a circle around only the fist cone until you are back where you started. 

  12. Stop and ask your dog to "Sit" next to you. Give a treat.

  13. Repeat the steps in the opposite direction.

  14. Move the cones to a different location and repeat. 

Success Criteria

Your dog is walking naturally beside you with no tension in the leash. They sit next to you when you stop and wait for the cue to begin again.

LEVEL 5

  1. Set up 2 cones or objects roughly 10-15' apart outside.

  2. Hold the leash with the "leash lock" and arms in a natural position. The goal is to not "use" the leash at all. It's only there for safety and compliance with leash laws.

  3. Ask your dog to "Sit" next to you at the first cone.

  4. Cue your dog to "Let's Go" and start walking. 

  5. Walk in a straight line to the 2nd cone. Stop and ask your dog to "Sit" next to you. Give a treat.

  6. Repeat the steps to return to the 1st cone. 

  7. Repeat several times. Hint: practice long enough, and your dog is getting the walk they haven't been getting while being trained to walk on a loose leash!

Success Criteria

Your dog is walking naturally beside you with no tension in the leash. They sit next to you when you stop and wait for the cue to begin again.

LEVEL 6

  1. Set up an oval track with cones or objects 10-15' apart outside.

  2. Hold the leash with the "leash lock" and arms in a natural position. The goal is to not "use" the leash at all. It's only there for safety and compliance with leash laws.

  3. Ask your dog to "Sit" next to you at the first cone.

  4. Cue your dog to "Let's Go" and start walking. 

  5. Walk around the oval once or twice and then cue your dog to "Turn". Make an about turn to the right and continue walking. 

  6. Stop and ask your dog to "Sit" and reward with a treat every couple of time around the track.

  7. If your dog begins tightening the leash, do not take a step forward on a tight leash. Cue the "Turn" right before the leash tigntens and reward your dog immediately with a treat after the about turn.

Success Criteria

Your dog is walking naturally beside you with no tension in the leash. They sit next to you when you stop and wait for the cue to begin again.

LEVEL 7

  1. Practice changes of pace ("slow", "fast", and "normal" and left about turns on the oval track.

Success Criteria

Your dog is walking naturally beside you with no tension in the leash. They sit next to you when you stop and wait for the cue to begin again.

LEVEL 8

  1. Start practicing loose leash walking on a real walk. Choose an area with minimal distractions. If your neighborhood has too much distraction (a lot of dogs, cats, kids playing, etc.), drive to a quieter park or walking trail. 

  2. Begin the walk as always, with the leash in "lock lock" hold and your dog in a Sit beside you. 

  3. Reward your dog several times with a treat for automatic check-ins. 

  4. Cue "Let's Go" and begin walking. Reward your dog for being beside you while you keep walking, frequently at first. Pick out landmarks such as trees, mailboxes, shadows on the road, etc. 

  5. As your dog gets better, spread out the treats gradually with each walk. 

  6. If the leash is about to tighten, cue "Turn" and  do an about turn. Reward your dog when they are next to you. About Turn again to go back in the direction you started in. 

Success Criteria

Your dog is walking naturally beside you with no tension in the leash. They sit next to you when you stop and wait for the cue to begin again.

LEVEL 9

  1. Even when your dog gets to the point of not needing treats to keep a loose leash, "Always Bring Treats" when you take them for a walk.

  2. Give a treat to your dog when they do something really great. For example, they keep a loose leash even when a squirrel runs by or you pass another dog.

  3. Treats can be helpful if a loose dog runs toward you and your dog. Grab a handful and toss them in the dog's face so you and your dog can get out of dodge while the loose dog is busy with the treats.

  4. Give permission to sniff. Sniffing and "reading the pee mail" is wonderful enrichment for dogs. In places where it is safe, give your dog permission to "go sniff" and let them take the lead.. When you are ready for them to walk with you again, give the cue "Let's Go".

Success Criteria

Congratulations! Walking with your dog is an activity you enjoy together and not something unpleasant you dread.

LEVEL 1

  1. Start inside your home with your dog on a leash.

  2. Hold the leash with the "leash lock" and arms in a natural position. The goal is to not "use" the leash at all. It's only there for safety and compliance with leash laws.

  3. Stand facing your dog, toe-to-toe.

  4. Take a couple of steps backwards so that your dog walks toward you, then turn to face the same direction as your dog and take another step.

  5. Feed your dog a treat for standing next to you. Give them the treat next to your leg and not out in front of you. Feed them in the position you want them to be in, which is beside you.

  6. Continue taking 1-3 steps and feeding your dog in position beside you until you run out of space.

  7. Repeat steps 3-6.

Success Criteria

Your dog is walking next to you consistently and not crossing in front of you, behind you, or between your legs. They understand the treat is for being beside you and not in front of you or behind you.

LEVEL 2

  1. Repeat Level 1 in different rooms inside your home.

Success Criteria

Your dog is walking next to you consistently and not crossing in front of you, behind you, or between your legs. They understand the treat is for being beside you and not in front of you or behind you.

LEVEL 3

  1. Repeat Level 1 in the back yard or other least exciting place outside of your home.

Success Criteria

Your dog is walking next to you consistently and not crossing in front of you, behind you, or between your legs. They understand the treat is for being beside you and not in front of you or behind you.

LEVEL 4

  1. Set up 3 cones or objects approximately 5' apart outside.

  2. Hold the leash with the "leash lock" and arms in a natural position. The goal is to not "use" the leash at all. It's only there for safety and compliance with leash laws.

  3. Ask your dog to "Sit" next to you at the first cone.

  4. Cue your dog to "Let's Go" and start walking. 

  5. Walk in a circle around all 3 cones until you are back where you started.

  6. Stop and ask your dog to "Sit" next to you. Give a treat.

  7. Cue your dog to "Let's Go" and start walking.

  8. Walk in a circle around only the first 2 cones until you are back where you started.

  9. Stop and ask your dog to "Sit" next to you. Give a treat.

  10. Cue your dog to "Let's Go" and start walking.

  11. Walk in a circle around only the fist cone until you are back where you started. 

  12. Stop and ask your dog to "Sit" next to you. Give a treat.

  13. Repeat the steps in the opposite direction.

  14. Move the cones to a different location and repeat. 

Success Criteria

Your dog is walking naturally beside you with no tension in the leash. They sit next to you when you stop and wait for the cue to begin again.

LEVEL 5

  1. Set up 2 cones or objects roughly 10-15' apart outside.

  2. Hold the leash with the "leash lock" and arms in a natural position. The goal is to not "use" the leash at all. It's only there for safety and compliance with leash laws.

  3. Ask your dog to "Sit" next to you at the first cone.

  4. Cue your dog to "Let's Go" and start walking. 

  5. Walk in a straight line to the 2nd cone. Stop and ask your dog to "Sit" next to you. Give a treat.

  6. Repeat the steps to return to the 1st cone. 

  7. Repeat several times. Hint: practice long enough, and your dog is getting the walk they haven't been getting while being trained to walk on a loose leash!

Success Criteria

Your dog is walking naturally beside you with no tension in the leash. They sit next to you when you stop and wait for the cue to begin again.

LEVEL 6

  1. Set up an oval track with cones or objects 10-15' apart outside.

  2. Hold the leash with the "leash lock" and arms in a natural position. The goal is to not "use" the leash at all. It's only there for safety and compliance with leash laws.

  3. Ask your dog to "Sit" next to you at the first cone.

  4. Cue your dog to "Let's Go" and start walking. 

  5. Walk around the oval once or twice and then cue your dog to "Turn". Make an about turn to the right and continue walking. 

  6. Stop and ask your dog to "Sit" and reward with a treat every couple of time around the track.

  7. If your dog begins tightening the leash, do not take a step forward on a tight leash. Cue the "Turn" right before the leash tigntens and reward your dog immediately with a treat after the about turn.

Success Criteria

Your dog is walking naturally beside you with no tension in the leash. They sit next to you when you stop and wait for the cue to begin again.

LEVEL 7

  1. Practice changes of pace ("slow", "fast", and "normal" and left about turns on the oval track.

Success Criteria

Your dog is walking naturally beside you with no tension in the leash. They sit next to you when you stop and wait for the cue to begin again.

LEVEL 8

  1. Start practicing loose leash walking on a real walk. Choose an area with minimal distractions. If your neighborhood has too much distraction (a lot of dogs, cats, kids playing, etc.), drive to a quieter park or walking trail. 

  2. Begin the walk as always, with the leash in "lock lock" hold and your dog in a Sit beside you. 

  3. Reward your dog several times with a treat for automatic check-ins. 

  4. Cue "Let's Go" and begin walking. Reward your dog for being beside you while you keep walking, frequently at first. Pick out landmarks such as trees, mailboxes, shadows on the road, etc. 

  5. As your dog gets better, spread out the treats gradually with each walk. 

  6. If the leash is about to tighten, cue "Turn" and  do an about turn. Reward your dog when they are next to you. About Turn again to go back in the direction you started in. 

Success Criteria

Your dog is walking naturally beside you with no tension in the leash. They sit next to you when you stop and wait for the cue to begin again.

LEVEL 9

  1. Even when your dog gets to the point of not needing treats to keep a loose leash, "Always Bring Treats" when you take them for a walk.

  2. Give a treat to your dog when they do something really great. For example, they keep a loose leash even when a squirrel runs by or you pass another dog.

  3. Treats can be helpful if a loose dog runs toward you and your dog. Grab a handful and toss them in the dog's face so you and your dog can get out of dodge while the loose dog is busy with the treats.

  4. Give permission to sniff. Sniffing and "reading the pee mail" is wonderful enrichment for dogs. In places where it is safe, give your dog permission to "go sniff" and let them take the lead.. When you are ready for them to walk with you again, give the cue "Let's Go".

Success Criteria

Congratulations! Walking with your dog is an activity you enjoy together and not something unpleasant you dread.

803.356.7468

200 Leisure Lane, Columbia SC
1481 Pisgah Church Road, Lexington SC

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